How to Use EPE

Using Entry to Practice Essentials is simple, however, understanding how the information is organized will help you get the most out of the platform!

Courses

 

EPE content is broken up into individual courses with the exception of the Practical Technique Video Library which has its own section in the system.

 

Each Course is divided into Lessons to help with organization and studying efficiency.

Lessons

Think of Lessons as containers for the main content of the site.  Lessons are further broken into Modules.  Most lesson pages will contain some relevant content, however most of your focus should be spent on Modules.

Modules

Modules contain the bulk of information you are looking for within individual Courses.  They will have text, images, and more to assist your learning.

EPE learning breakdown

Start Studying

Course Home Page

Starting to study is easy!  To begin, simply click the STUDY button in the top menu.  This is the place to go for all your studying needs.  You can quickly access any course we offer through this menu.  In the video example here, we will select the Cervical Spine course.

Once on the course homepage, to access some of the material within the Lesson we can either click on the Lesson Title to move onto the corresponding Lesson Page, or we can click “Expand All” to reveal all Modules associated with each Lesson (if applicable).  We will now click on the Lesson: “Pathology”.

Lesson Home Page

You should now be in a Lesson!  The Lesson you are in will contain either content to study, a list of Modules, or both.  In this particular case, we are presented with a list of Modules containing the content related to the course we are in.  We can now click on each one and begin studying!

Progressing in EPE

Let’s face it.  The amount of information you need to know to prepare for the Physiotherapy National Competency Examination is huge!  It can be intimidating trying to stay on top of what you have and have not studied.  EPE will track your progress and display where you are at as long as you let it know!

 

EPE can tell you whether you have or have not completed the following:

  1. Courses
  2. Lessons
  3. Modules
  4. Examinations

If you would like to study a course that you haven’t reviewed yet, simply navigate to the Courses Library and look at the courses there.  If you have completed the course, it will be marked with a “COMPLETED” green tag.  If it is still incomplete, it will be marked with an “ENROLLED” blue tag!

If you wish to see exactly how close you are to completing a course you can view this within the Course’s home page.

Tracking Progress

As mentioned, in order to ensure that EPE is properly tracking your progress, you will need to let it know.  This means clicking the “Mark Complete” button at the end of each Module or Lesson once you are finished.  Don’t worry though!  You can always come back to the Module or Lesson later regardless of whether you have marked it complete or not.

Mark Complete button used to track progress

Once you have marked all Modules and Lessons for the entire Course complete, the Course will automatically be registered as Complete and the ribbon will change from Blue to Green in the Course Library!

Studying for the Practical PCE

Practical Video Library

Although the Practical Portion of the PCE is very performance

focused, there is still a strong need to review the theory behind all the actions you are asked to perform.  Therefore, we recommend reviewing all other theory courses prior to studying the Practical Course. 

The Practical Course is a little different from our other courses in the sense that it is primarily video and interaction based.  You will be presented with scenarios, which you are asked to perform within a certain time limit, then the keys to performance and demonstration of adequate technique are revealed.  Otherwise, progressing is the exact same as any other EPE course!

We also recommend reviewing the Practical Technique Library.  As mentioned above, the Practical Technique Videos are not housed within a course.  Instead, the Practical Technique Library is accessible here!

Keys to Learning With EPE

If you know nothing, at least know this about the PCE:

It’s general accepted that challenging your national entry to practice examination (PCE) is one of the more difficult and stressful activities you’ll encounter during your professional career. Part of that anxiety comes from the knowledge and excitement that all your hard work is about to payoff.  The other part of that anxiety comes from the pressures of meeting expectations; mainly your own, but also from the fear of the unknown.

It’s been proven that students who are familiar with their test environment, including the test location, the structure of the questions and the expectations of the examiners, will overall fair better come exam day.  Why?  Because the more  familiar you are with an environment, the more relaxed you’ll be – and the more relaxed you’ll be, the more readily you’ll be able to access all that stored information you’ve been packing away for the big day.

With this in mind, we have compiled a broad spectrum of useful information regarding the national entry to practice exam.
Here you’ll be able to find:

  • The purpose and structure of the PCE.
  • What you can expect the day of your exam.
  • Who is eligible and registration information.
  • Fees and location information.
  • And some helpful guidelines on what to not expect (ie; what not to study, so that you don’t waist your time).

 

The EPE team is made up of physiotherapists who were once in the same position you are right now.  Soon you’ll be our colleagues and we’ll be practicing with you side-by-side.  We want to see you succeed and to do that we reviewed a significant amount of research regarding the “optimal study methods” to assist with information retention and recall.  It was with these strategies in mind that we build EPEs format.

Here you’ll be able to also find:

  • Research supported tactics to help you get the most out of your study time.
  • Research based suggestions on how not to study – because it doesn’t work.
  • Insight into EPE’s custom design and how it was set up to help all styles of learners.

What you study matters, but how you study matter more.
Here are 8 critical tips to adopt into your study strategy if you want to pass the PCE.

Variability is the Key

It should come as no surprise that studies show that engaging students in a variety of learning and practice methods is the key to information retention. When was the last time a school program had one professor after another just read the book to you?  Never?… Probably Never!!!
This is because professors and the universities that employ them know all too well that a mixture of definitions, visual aids, analogies, associations between topics, re-writing in one’s own words, group work, and practical application are the best ways to ensure personal connections to the material can be made by each student and that everyone’s learning style will be met… and the EPE team knows that too. For this reason, the EPE online study guide has been created with a multitude of written, visual, and audio education tools.

Language is Essential

Comparatively, exchange students statistically do worse on examinations that test conceptual, strategic, historical, and linguistic material. Subjects such as writing, literature, geography, biological sciences (medicine), and history are all good examples.  Conversely, subjects that are unaffected include Music and Mathematics. Why? Simply put, regardless of the language or culture that a person comes from, music notes still look like music notes and calculus and algebra are just that… still calculus and algebra. Unlike literature, medicine and geography, language is not a factor in Music and Math.
Understanding the medical language of physiotherapy can be a daunting task for many students – especially those that don’t have experience learning a 2nd language beforehand. It’s also a key contributor to poorer scores on the PNE.  One falls interpretation of an –itis, an –osis or an –opathy and the target of the question is lost, making the correct answer nearly impossible to identify.
To help with language comprehension, EPE has put together over 2,500 defined glossary terms that you will encounter on the PNE exam.  Don’t have time to read our glossary like a proverbial dictionary??  We don’t blame you… and that is why we’ve also embedded the glossary in our review pages. Simply place your cursor over a word, and if it’s in our glossary, a pop-up bubble will appear, instantly helping you define the word… without requiring you to leave your study page. How’s that for helpful?

Change of Scenery

There are a number of scientifically proven study techniques we’ve known for a while that are often simply ignored. One of these is that moving to a different room to study improves retention, a big supporting factor for outdoor education.

[The effect of environmental context and recognition memory and claims of remembering. Hockley WE. Journal of experimental psychology. Learning, memory, and cognition, 2009, Feb.;34(6):0278-7393.]

Variability in Study Materials

Just like changing the scenery, scientists have also proven that it’s better to focus on several distinct but related topics rather than zeroing in on just one area. For example, instead of memorizing vocabulary alone, mix in reading as well. Likewise, if you are doing math, tackle several concepts instead of just one.

You Need Time Between Learning Sessions

A new learning technique called “spaced repetition” involves breaking up information into small chunks and reviewing them consistently over a long period of time.  So, don’t try to memorize the entire periodic table in one sitting… instead, learn a few rows every day and review each lesson before starting anything new.

[Synaptic Evidence for the Efficacy of Spaced Learning.  Kram EA, Babayan AH, Gavin CF. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 2012, Mar.;109(13): 1091-6490.]

Write Your Way to Better Recall

Put those third-grade penmanship lessons to good use. Some research suggests that we store information more securely when we write it out by hand than when we type it. Start by recopying the most important notes from the semester onto a new sheet of paper.

[Anne Mangen, The National Center for Reading Education and Research, University of Stavange, Norway]
[Jean-Luc Velay, Mediterranean Institute for Cognitive Neuroscience, CNRS, Université de la Méditerranée, France]

Stress: Relief or Avoidance of Stress is Best

Here is another reason that it’s best to not wait until the last minute to study: stress hinders learning. Researchers have found that even stress that lasts as briefly as a couple of hours can engage corticotropin-releasing hormones that disrupt the process of creating and storing memories. So, taking study breaks to exercise or draw a few deep breaths will help your studying if they lower your stress level.

Practice Tests Can Help

Some studies have shown that students who tested themselves after reviewing a topic retained up to 50% more of the material a week later than students who did not opt to take a test. Challenging small banks of multiple-choice questions at intervals between a topic or review has the most benefit on information retention.

[Repeated testing produces superior transfer of learning relative to repeated studying. Butler AC. Journal of experimental psychology. Learning, memory, and cognition, 2010, Dec.;36(5):1939-1285.]
[Test enhanced learning: taking memory tests improves long-term retention.  Roediger HL, Karpicke JD. Psychological science, 2006, May.;17(3):0956-7976.]

Textbooks have been around for centuries, and like anything that old they come with strings attached – both good and bad!  Over all those years, several study methods have become common, and for better or for worse, at one point or another, we’ve all tried each and everyone of them. In the previous lesson we reviewed which study methods have been proven effective, now lets take a moment and review those that aren’t.
Before we begin, lets first establish some of the key problems:

1. Being familiar with a material is not the same as understanding it.

You’re familiar with the Mona Lisa, but could you paint it?  You’re familiar with Facebook, but could you program the code needed to re-create it? Just because we have seen, heard of, or navigated something before, does that mean we know it thoroughly?   In the same way, the sight of certain words and theories may feel familiar, but that doesn’t mean you understand how to handle their meaning in another situation.

2. Time spent studying isn’t the same as productive time spent studying.

Before launching EPE, we frequently heard about how much time students spent studying for the PCE. It wasn’t uncommon to hear study hours sore into the hundreds.  However, learning isn’t measured by how many minutes or hours you spend on it; it’s measured by how much you can remember and explain. Three hours of active engagement, scenario application, practice quizzing, and practical replication is far more effective then twice as much time just thumbing through the pages of a familiar textbook. You have to become actively engaged with the material.

3. Information isn’t as strong without application.

The brain doesn’t retain information unless it interacts with it somehow. Reading, or Re-reading without conversation, personal rewording, testing, teaching to others, or visual stimulus (pictures/video) is no better than skimming.

Now, onto the 3 least effective study methods;

1. Highlighting

The runaway favourite technique of students was found to perform spectacularly poorly when done on its own under controlled conditions. It seems intuitive that highlighting alone is ineffective for the same reasons it is so popular – it requires no training, it takes practically no additional time and crucially, it involves very little thought above the effort taken to simply read a piece of text. Yes, it’s true that the ability to create a highlighting function for our online study guide is both easy and possible, but the EPE team is interested in just one result: your success on the PCE, and for that reason we’ve excluded a highlighting option.

Dunlosky, J., Rawson, K., Marsh, E., Nathan, M., & Willingham, D. (2013). Improving Students’ Learning With Effective Learning Techniques: Promising Directions From Cognitive and Educational Psychology Psychological Science in the Public Interest, 14 (1), 4-58.

2. Textbooks / 3. Aimless Reading and Re-Reading

The trouble with textbooks is volume. Currently, if you choose to review for the PCE using textbooks, you’ll need to review an average of 7-9 books that you’ve required over the 2-3 years of physiotherapy school. What’s worse, you only need ‘some’ of the information from ‘some’ of the chapters within those books, bogging down your time and your backpack.  Bouncing from one chapter to another, and from one book to another is both inefficient, and can be down right frustrating.  The style, format, layout, and writing style differs from one textbook to another, and all of them will differ from the way you took your class notes.  Bottomline; your goal is to review and store information, not decode and gel back together content from a half-dozen sources.
In 2009, a professor of psychology at Washington University in St. Louis published an article in the journal of Psychological Science advising students against studying by reading and/or re-reading textbooks because it leads students to believe that they know more material better then they actually do because the content is sitting out in front of them.  His suggestion was that students should use active recall which involves reciting, explaining, of actively using information to better cement it into long-term memory.

The Trouble with Memory

Converting information from short-term memory to long-term memory requires various combinations of information contact, focused attention, pure desire, and/or emotion response. With respect to academic information at the post-secondary level, the difference between the information retained long-term and all the other information depends primarily on frequency of information contact.  Now, before you object to this statement, yes…, we concede, if the topic taught touched you emotionally – say perhaps you laugh out loud when you learn how to test the S5 nerve root, or you had a good cry after being told you’d have to catch sputum on your first placement, then sure, that information might be tough to forget; however, for your other lessons, frequency of contact will be the key.
This has been proven scientifically and is sometimes called the “Interval Training” or “Curve of Forgetting”.
Essentially, what this study shows is that if you were tested on material the same day that you learned it, you would have retained about 90-100% of the information. This means that the average person would score 90-100% assuming they paid a “normal” amount of attention during the class period.
However, if you had no contact with the information again and were tested 24 hours later, you would only score between 20 – 50% on the test.  The reason for this is that only 20 – 50% of the information would still remain between short- and long-term memory storage.  The rest of the information has simply been discarded. Why? Because we didn’t need it right away and we had to make room for all the new events and information that occurred in the past 24 hours.
Now, after one week, we would, on average, only be able to about 10-15% and by day 30 only 2%-3% at best.  Ironically, it’s around this time that exam start to loom.  If you’ve even begun studying for an exam and as you went through your notes thought – “wow, I literally don’t remember any of this” – well, this is why.

THE GOOD NEWS: You Can Change all This… and It’s not That Hard.

Reviewing and reprocessing the same chunk of information improves the signal strength of that specific data and your brain more readily converts strong signals to long-term memory.  Essentially, your brain says, “Oh, there it is again, I’d better keep that.” When you are exposed to the same information repeatedly, it takes less and less time to “activate” the information in your long-term memory and it becomes easier for you to retrieve the information when you need it.
Here’s the formula:

  • Listen to a Lesson
  • Within 24 hours spend 10 minutes reviewing = raise retention to almost to 100%
  • 7-10 days later spend only 5 minutes reviewing and again = re-raise to near 100%
  • Repeat 4-6 weeks later for only 2-4 minutes and yup, you got it now – 100%
  • After this, if you review it for 2-4 minutes every 4-6 months, retention will once again bounce back to almost original levels

So how does this help you on the PNE?

Think about it: by using this strategy and reviewing your notes anytime, anywhere you like with EPE’s online review program, you could FULLY refresh 2 weeks of class in under an hour!  That equates to refreshing 2 years of school in just 5-6 days!!!

About the PCE

(Disclaimer:  The intentions of presenting the information below are to facilitate information transfer, awareness, and ease of information access.  In no way is  EPE, its team, or any of its members responsible for the content below.  For up to date information and assurance of accuracy please visit http://www.alliancept.org/ directly)

Purpose and Structure of the PCE

The Physiotherapy Competency Examination (PCE) tests whether qualified exam candidates have demonstrated a minimum standard of practice. It fairly and accurately evaluates the competencies needed to practise physiotherapy. All physiotherapy regulators in Canada except Quebec’s require applicants to have passed the PCE before being granted the right to practice, (although Quebec requires all applicants trained outside Quebec to have passed the PCE). Quebec-trained applicants must pass a comprehensive exam unique to that province that is equivalent to the PCE. The PCE tests the essential competencies of physiotherapy practice – the essential knowledge, skills and abilities. It tests history-taking, physical examination, data interpretation, clinical problem solving, treatment techniques, ethics, safety, interviewing and communication. The exam covers the core clinical practice areas: neuromusculoskeletal, neurological, cardiopulmonary-vascular and multisystem.

The exam has two components:

Written Component

Purpose

  • Tests your understanding of essential physiotherapy knowledge, skills and abilities
  • Tests your understanding of the principles and processes of physiotherapy practice

Structure

  • One 4-hour session
  • Multiple choice
  • About 200 questions
  • Note: You must successfully complete the Written Component before you can take the Clinical Component.

Timeline

  • Offered several times each year
  • Results mailed within 6 weeks of the exam

Clinical Component  

Purpose

  • Tests your understanding and application of physiotherapy knowledge, skills and abilities
  • Tests your ability to safely and effectively apply the principles and processes of physiotherapy practice

Structure

  • One 5-6 hour session (approximately)
  • Objective structured clinical examination (OSCE)
  • 16 stations total;
  • 8 stations: a 10-minute encounter with a standardized client
  • 8 stations: a 5-minute encounter with a standardized client, followed by a 5-minute written station

Timeline

  • Offered twice each year
  • Results mailed within 12 weeks of the exam

Note: The information herein has been borrowed from the Canadian Alliance of Physiotherapy Regulators website that can be accessed directly at: http://www.alliancept.org/.  This information is not owned, regulated, or under the control of EPE and EPE is not responsible for its day-by-day accuracy.

Note: The information herein has been borrowed from the Canadian Alliance of Physiotherapy Regulators website that can be accessed directly at: http://www.alliancept.org/.  This information is not owned, regulated, or under the control of EPE and EPE is not responsible for its day-by-day accuracy.

Registering for an Exam

Follow these steps to register for an exam.

  1. Read the Exam Registration Guide and Exam Policies.
  2. Make sure you are eligible for the exam. Check the Exam Policies for information about eligibility.
  3. Fill in the exam application form for the Written Component and/or Clinical Component. Be sure to mark the exam date you want, and your site choices. Print a copy of your completed form.
  4. Print and complete the Declaration of Identity if you have not already sent one to us. Be sure to read the instructions for the Declaration of Identity and have it notarized by a Notary Public before you send it.
  5. Complete the credit card section of the application OR include a money order or certified cheque with your application.
  6. Read the declaration, then sign and date the form.
  7. Put your completed original application form with payment in the mail. Include your Declaration of Identity with accompanying second identical photo as applicable. You must send this unless you have already sent one to credentialling. Please only include a photo if you are submitting a new Declaration of Identity form.

If your application is not complete, we will send it back to you.

If you want us to verify your exam status with a regulator, print and complete the Verification Request Form. You can send this with your application.

Withdrawals

To withdraw from the exam, please notify us in writing. We do not accept a verbal withdrawal. PLEASE NOTE: Administrative Fees will be deducted from your exam payment.

  • There is a $300.00 administrative fee for withdrawals prior to the application deadline of the exam.
  • There is a $500.00 administrative fee for withdrawals after the application deadline of the exam.

Illness or Other Extraordinary Circumstances before Examination Day

  • In order for candidates to optimize exam performance, candidates are strongly encouraged not to attempt an examination and to make an appropriate withdrawal if, prior to the examination, they are ill or have extraordinary circumstances, including bereavement, that may affect their performance in the examination. The above noted withdrawal fee shall be applied.

Absence / Failure to make Exam

Absence due to Illness or Other Extraordinary Circumstances on Examination Day

  • If you do not attend the exam on exam day without arranging a withdrawal in advance, this is considered a ‘no show’ and you will forfeit your entire exam fee. However, considerations for partial refunds shall be made for severe illness or extraordinary circumstances.
  • If you are unable to attend an examination sitting due to a matter that arises suddenly on the day of the examination, you must immediately notify the Alliance by email to [email protected].
  • In addition, to be considered for a partial refund, the Alliance must receive supporting documentation in writing within 7 calendar days after the date of the exam. If you meet these deadlines, we will review your situation and consider treating your case as a withdrawal. This will be considered on a case by case basis. If absent from the examination due to illness, you must provide an original Alliance Candidate Medical Certificate verifying that you were examined at the time of the illness. The date of the certificate must be appropriate for or match the examination date (i.e., certificates dated more than two days after the November Clinical Exam or three days after the June Clinical Exam will not be accepted).
  • If absent from the examination due to bereavement, you must provide a copy of the death certificate, verifying that the bereavement was at the same time as the examination.

Unsuccessful Result in the Written Component (Qualifying Exam)

If you pre-register for the Clinical Component (Physiotherapy National Exam) but do not successfully complete the Written Component (Qualifying Exam), you can request to receive a full refund of the Clinical Component exam fee. Alternatively, you may have the option to transfer the Clinical Component exam fee. A memo outlining your Clinical Component exam fee options will be included within your results package.

(Disclaimer:  The intentions of presenting the information below are to facilitate information transfer, awareness, and ease of information access.  In no way is  EPE, its team, or any of its members responsible for the content below.  For up to date information and assurance of accuracy please visit http://www.alliancept.org/ directly)

Note: The information herein has been borrowed from the Canadian Alliance of Physiotherapy Regulators website that can be accessed directly at: http://www.alliancept.org/.  This information is not owned, regulated, or under the control of EPE and EPE is not responsible for its day-by-day accuracy.

Eligibility Criteria when Applying for the PCE

Eligibility Requirements for Canadian-Educated Candidate

  • A minimum of 1,025 hours of supervised clinical practice, along with completion of the clinical requirements for registration in the province in which you received your physiotherapy education.
  • Provide an official transcript proving you have successfully completed an entry-level degree in physical therapy from a physiotherapy program accredited with Physiotherapy EducationAccreditation Canada (PEAC). Transcripts must be received by CAPR directly from the university.
  • Proficiency in English or French. (Note: If you are graduating from an accredited Canadian physiotherapy program, we will consider you to be proficient in English or French.)
  • If you are enrolled in a Canadian physiotherapy program, you may complete the Written Component during your final term of academic study. We will confirm with your university that you are enrolled in university before the exam date. You cannot take the Clinical Component until you have completed your course of study and are eligible for graduation.

Eligibility Requirements for Internationally Educated Candidates

  • Successful completion of the Educational Credentials and Qualifications Assessment. You must complete this before you apply for the Physiotherapy Competency Examination. The assessment determines whether your education and qualifications are substantially equivalent to those of a Canadian-educated physiotherapist. For current information about credentialing, and to receive a credentialing application, visit our website, www.alliancept.org, or contact our office.

Application Procedure

You can apply for both components at the same time, or you can apply for the Written Component first and then apply for the Clinical Component later.  Visit www.alliancept.org for details.

(Disclaimer:  The intentions of presenting the information below are to facilitate information transfer, awareness, and ease of information access.  In no way is  EPE, its team, or any of its members responsible for the content below.  For up to date information and assurance of accuracy please visit http://www.alliancept.org/ directly)

Note: The information herein has been borrowed from the Canadian Alliance of Physiotherapy Regulators website that can be accessed directly at: http://www.alliancept.org/.  This information is not owned, regulated, or under the control of EPE and EPE is not responsible for its day-by-day accuracy.

Listed below are the PCE Exam dates and locations.  Use this to quickly find out where and when you can challenge your exam.

Exam Dates

Written Component
(Qualifying Exam)
Saturday, March 17, 2018
Monday, May 7, 2018
Saturday, July 14, 2018
Monday, September 17, 2018
Monday, November 26, 2018
Clinical Component
(Physiotherapy National Exam)
Saturday, June 2, 2018
Sunday, November 18, 2018

Exam Locations

ProvinceWritten Component
Site Choices
Clinical Component
Site Choices
AlbertaCalgary
Edmonton
Lethbridge
Red Deer
Edmonton
British ColumbiaBurnaby
Richmond
Surrey
Vancouver
Victoria
Vancouver
ManitobaBrandon
Winnipeg
Winnipeg
(November exam only)
New BrunswickFredericton
Moncton
Saint John
Newfoundland & LabradorSt. John’s
Northwest TerritoriesYellowknife
Nova ScotiaHalifaxHalifax
(November exam only)
OntarioHamilton
London
Mississauga
North Bay
Ottawa
Scarborough
Thunder Bay
Toronto
Windsor
Hamilton (November exam only)
Ottawa
Toronto
Prince Edward IslandCharlottetown
QuebecMontreal
SaskatchewanRegina
Saskatoon
Saskatoon
(November exam only)
YukonWhitehorse

Disclaimer: Exam sites are subject to change. Consult current registration forms for most up-to-date locations.

(Disclaimer:  The intentions of presenting the information below are to facilitate information transfer, awareness, and ease of information access.  In no way is  EPE, its team, or any of its members responsible for the content below.  For up to date information and assurance of accuracy please visit http://www.alliancept.org/ directly)

Note: The information herein has been borrowed from the Canadian Alliance of Physiotherapy Regulators website that can be accessed directly at: http://www.alliancept.org/.  This information is not owned, regulated, or under the control of EPE and EPE is not responsible for its day-by-day accuracy.

Exam Fees

Component2017 Exam Fee2018 Exam Fee
Written Component
(Qualifying Exam)
$953.00$972.00
Clinical Component
(Physiotherapy National Exam)
$1,725.00$1,760.00
Total$2,678.00$2,732.00

(Disclaimer:  The intentions of presenting the information below are to facilitate information transfer, awareness, and ease of information access.  In no way is  EPE, its team, or any of its members responsible for the content below.  For up to date information and assurance of accuracy please visit http://www.alliancept.org/ directly)

Note: The information herein has been borrowed from the Canadian Alliance of Physiotherapy Regulators website that can be accessed directly at: http://www.alliancept.org/.  This information is not owned, regulated, or under the control of EPE and EPE is not responsible for its day-by-day accuracy.

Exam Day Procedure

Written Component (Qualifying Exam)

The Written Component will move to a computer-based test format in July 2015. The computer format allows candidates to switch between English and French at any time during the exam, at any site. Where Exam Proctors speak English only, instructions to candidates will be available in French in written format at every site. Candidates are encouraged to try out the Computer Based Testing Orientation Tutorial, available on the Alliance website, to experience the language feature. Clinical Component (Physiotherapy National Exam) You can take the Clinical Component in either English or French (Ottawa only). The examiners and standardized clients will speak to you in the language you select on your application form. We will give you written questions in both languages. If you want to use French for any portion of the Clinical Component, you must take the Clinical Component at the Ottawa site. No other site offers the Clinical Component in French. You must complete all clinical encounters in the language you choose on your application. For written questions, however, you can answer in either language at the Ottawa site only.

Written Component

On exam day, report to the registration desk by the designated reporting time, present your valid government issued photo ID (driver’s license, passport or permanent residence card). The proctor will match your valid government issued photo ID to the candidate entry certificate that is sent by the Alliance to the exam site. After verification, the proctor will hand you your entry certificate and you can sign in. You will take your entry certificate to the exam hall. Any candidate who arrives 15 minutes late for the Written Component of the PCE has to sign a Candidate Waiver form that states they were offered an opportunity to withdraw from the exam due to late arrival. The candidate takes full responsibility for their choice to continue with the examination. If a candidate signs the Candidate Waiver Form, the time the candidate started the exam will be marked by the proctor at the exam site. The candidate will not be given the full 4- hours for the exam. For example – If the exam is from 9:00am to 1:00pm at an exam site and a candidate arrives at 9.15am and choses to sign the Candidate Waiver Form, then the candidate’s exam will still conclude at 1.00pm. The Candidate Waiver Form indicates that the candidate understands that the Canadian Alliance of Physiotherapy Regulators (The Alliance) and its computer-based partner, Yardstick Inc, take no responsibility for unforeseen circumstances that may arise as a result of this decision.

Effective January 1, 2016, candidates arriving more than 15 minutes late will not be permitted to take the exam as this disrupts candidates already in session. Candidates arriving more than 15 minutes late for a written exam will also forfeit their exam fee.

Clinical (Practical) Component

On exam day, report to the registration desk by the designated reporting time, present your Entry Certificate and sign in

(Disclaimer:  The intentions of presenting the information below are to facilitate information transfer, awareness, and ease of information access.  In no way is  EPE, its team, or any of its members responsible for the content below.  For up to date information and assurance of accuracy please visit http://www.alliancept.org/ directly)